mushpatatas:

I am very much honored that my short film, “To Manong Carlos”, is going to be screened alongside “One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo & Gene Viernes”, a full-length documentary about the legacy and impact of the work and lives of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes, two Filipino-American activists and fishing cannery union members who were murdered for their involvement in union reform and fighting for workers’ rights. International Examiner Seattle has the full story here.

One Generation’s time is narrated by Geo from Seattle-based hip-hop duo Blue Scholars. While I’m not sure if he’ll be attending the screening, Cindy Domingo (Silme’s sister), Ron Chew (author of the book that is the basis of the film), and Shannon Gee (the director of the documentary) will be around after the screening for a panel discussion. Please drop by our screening at Ark Lodge Cinemas on February 9, 2014, at 2:00 pm. Tickets are available here 

(via fascinasians)

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Glacier Grey
Reuben Wu | website | facebook | TUMBLR

(Source: GIVNCVRLOS, via givncvrlos)

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Mike Stacey | website

Mike Stacey | website

(Source: GIVNCVRLOS, via givncvrlos)

1,682 notes

magnius159:

The Asian American Movement: protesters protest police brutality and racial profiling during the 1970′s (photo credit: Corky Lee)

In the wake of the #AsianPrivilege response hash-tag to #NotYourAsianSidekick and #BlackPowerYellowPeril, it appears as if (among other misguided ideas) there is a prevailing notion out there that, in contrast to other minorities, Asian Americans “lack a history of resistance” (or that we think we do), and that this invisibility and dearth of civil rights history actually confers upon the Asian American community a form of racial privilege.
Putting aside the second half of that assertion regarding privilege for a minute, there’s one other major problem: any argument that relies upon the assumption that Asian Americans lack a history of resistance is patently ahistorical.
Like really, really, really wrong. Like insultingly wrong.
After the jump, here are 10 examples of Asian American’s history of oppression and political resistance.

magnius159:

The Asian American Movement: protesters protest police brutality and racial profiling during the 1970′s (photo credit: Corky Lee)

In the wake of the #AsianPrivilege response hash-tag to #NotYourAsianSidekick and #BlackPowerYellowPeril, it appears as if (among other misguided ideas) there is a prevailing notion out there that, in contrast to other minorities, Asian Americans “lack a history of resistance” (or that we think we do), and that this invisibility and dearth of civil rights history actually confers upon the Asian American community a form of racial privilege.

Putting aside the second half of that assertion regarding privilege for a minute, there’s one other major problem: any argument that relies upon the assumption that Asian Americans lack a history of resistance is patently ahistorical.

Like really, really, really wrong. Like insultingly wrong.

After the jump, here are 10 examples of Asian American’s history of oppression and political resistance.

(via colinresponse)

3,361 notes

Silogs ALL DAY

foodandsh-t:

image

Coinciding with the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, we’re launching a Filipino Breakfast pop-up event titled “Silogs ALL DAY” at Seattle’s Inay’s Asian Pacific Cuisine on Monday, January 20th.

We want to start off 2014 the same way we started off our mornings during our month-long trip…

(via prometheusbrown)

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andrewkodama:

mememe

andrewkodama:

mememe

18 notes

mdme-x:

untitled by Benoit.P on Flickr.Benoit Paillé | flickr

mdme-x:

untitled by Benoit.P on Flickr.

Benoit Paillé | flickr

(via creelfish)

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andrewkodama:

couple months ago,

iphone

31 notes

andrewkodama:

forest light iv

6,056 notes

andrewkodama:

forest light

(via allsineed)

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